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LeFevre Bible

"A boy of sixteen who prized his father's Bible above everything else to save from his wrecked home. LeFevres are not ashamed of." - George Newton LeFevre

bibleThis French bible was printed in 1608 in Geneva, Switzerland. It originally belonged to Abraham LeFevre, a French Huguenot who was martyred, together with his wife and six of his children, after the Edict of Nantes in 1685. How the bible came into his possession is not known but likely acquired at great risk. During that time in France, caught owning a bible could bring instant death.

Abraham's son, Isaac LeFevre, was able to escape. He rescued the bible and fled to Bavaria. Tradition has it, he smuggled the bible out of France hidden in a loaf of bread. Isaac joined up with the Ferree family in their journey, became their adopted son, and later married their daughter, Catherine. Strong in his Huguenot faith, Isaac Lefevre continued to use this bible until his death in 1751. After being passed down through several generations, it now has a permanent home at the Lancaster County Historical Society where it can be viewed only by special request and appointment.

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