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Children's Clothing 1700's

 

  • Referred to today as a diaper was at that time called a "clout". It was usually made of a linen fabric and was either pinned with straight pins or tied with tapes. A cover of wool "pilch" was worn over the clout for further protection.
  • All infants, both boys and girls, wore a full length, shapeless gown (similar to an adult shift), open down the front which could be pinned or tied.
  • Toddler's gowns often had cords or strips of fabric, "leading strings" sewn to the shoulder which were used by adults to guide and prevent the child from falling.
  • A padded "pudding hat" was tied on the head of a child learning to walk. This was to protect the child if it fell and hit its head.
  • Stays were worn by children, both boys and girls, from the age of about eighteen months or until they were walking well. These stays fostered good posture. Boys wore them from about the age of four to seven years old. Girls wore them for the rest of their lives.
  • "Breeching" was the time at which a young boy (age four to seven years old) would be taken out of his child's gown and given his first pair of breeches. A party would sometimes be given to celebrate the end of his childhood.
  • By the age of ten, boys were wearing clothes similar to their fathers. Young girls dressed like their mothers.

 

 

         
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